Monday, July 21, 2014

Record-low turnout for midterm primaries could reflect increasing voter apathy

Voter turnout down by roughly 50 percent in the last 50 years
Record-low turnout for midterm primaries could reflect increasing voter apathy
Image Credits: Tom Arthur via Wikimedia Commons
by JC Sevcik | UPI | July 21, 2014

A survey of voter rolls shows record-low voter turnout in 15 of the first 25 statewide primaries for this midterm election.
The non-profit, non-partisan Center for the Study of the American Electorate at American University’s School of Public Affairs reported only 14.8 percent of eligible voters cast ballots in the first 25 state primaries, down from 18.3 percent in the 2010 midterm elections.
That’s about 18.2 million ballots from a pool of some 122.8 million eligible voters.
According to the CSAE, Democratic turnout sas fallen more dramatically than Republican turnout, with Dems down 29 percent from 8.7 percent in 2010 to 6.1 percent in 2014. The GOP’s decline wasn’t as drastic, dropping from 9.6 percent to 8.2 percent.
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Sunday, July 20, 2014

Malaysian Flight False Flag Evidence Revealed

Neocons and their state-run media would have us believe the case is closed
by Infowars.com | July 20, 2014





Less than 24 hours after the devastating attack that downed Malaysian Airlines Flight MH17, Neocons and their state-run media would have us believe the case is closed…before an investigation has even been launched. We break down the repetitive false-flag narrative.

Saturday, July 19, 2014

AK47 banned by Executive Order

U.S. House passes vote to permanently ban any taxation of Internet access

Not to be confused with state taxation of online shopping purchases
U.S. House passes vote to permanently ban any taxation of Internet access
by Joe Harpaz | Forbes | July 19, 2014



The U.S. House of Representatives passed a vote this week to permanently ban any taxation of Internet access, unleashing a litany of controversial issues around technological innovation and state tax revenue.
First some background: With this vote for the Permanent Internet Tax Freedom Act, the House has agreed to permanently prohibit any state or local taxes on Internet access. Not to be confused with state taxation of online shopping purchases, which is another issue that’s been debated for some time, this bill focuses squarely on the ability of a state to impose a tax on Internet connections. A temporary ban, which has been in place since 1998, is set to expire in November of this year. The bill is reported to have bipartisan support in the Senate.
On the surface, this all looks pretty benign. With the exception of seven states that were grandfathered out of the temporary Internet tax ban, notably Texas, Wisconsin and Ohio, states have never taxed Internet access, so a permanent ban on something they never taxed anyway should come as no great loss. Peel back the layers of this issue a bit further, though, and a very complicated set of issues emerge that factor into everything from technological innovation to generational trends in communication to persistent shortfalls in state government coffers.
To truly understand the potential implications of a permanent ban on Internet access taxes, you have to look at the growth of Internet access in this country over the last several years. According to the Leichtman Research Group, a media and entertainment research firm, there were a total of 85.5 million broadband Internet subscriptions in the U.S. through the first quarter of 2014. Approximately 1.2 million of these were added in Q1 of this year alone. On top of this, the trade group CTIA-The Wireless Association, reports that mobile Internet use in the U.S. more than doubled to 3.2 trillion megabytes from 2012 to 2013.

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