Friday, December 25, 2009

The Great Gathering


We are in a unique time on the planet; humanity is now facing a crossroad. The choices we make today will affect our children for generations to come.

By coming together in our hearts, we can and will create the change we want to see in the world. Every day more people are awakening to understand that we must act responsibly and act now to create this change.

How do we begin to make this change with our world facing crisis on so many fronts: financial woes, famine, homelessness, perpetual wars, food shortages, exploitation and disease (to name only a few)? We do have a choice.

We are in the time of choice and human beings around the world are feeling a call to unite and make our voices heard and our actions count. People from the indigenous world to the political are beginning to step forward and speak of this change through action and choice.

There are many indigenous groups, as well as different faiths and beliefs, now sharing prophecies regarding information about this special time on the planet. Within all beliefs there is a similar thread that gives us the same message: we must unite in our hearts in order to overcome the challenges we are now facing on the earth.

What is The Great Gathering? It is the same message of many beliefs from around the world. The message is simple: now is the time for humanity to unite to create the one voice for the people of Earth.

This Great Gathering will be in every country around the world; we will stand together and join our hands, our hearts and our voices. This will create the spark that brings light to the rest of the world and to humanity.

All groups from all directions will join in this celebration of life, of nature, of humanity and all that is.

Neighborhood groups, churches, friends, coworkers, families, corporations that are trying to be responsible, politicians trying to create change, religious leaders, eco-villages, farm associations, truckers, health care workers, humanitarian organizations, educators, laborers, dishwashers, peacekeepers, all races, religions and economic backgrounds (the list is endless) will come together as one in our hearts. Together we will be one voice and change will happen.

In order to begin The Great Gathering we must lay the foundation for this event through our networks of friends and associates. Change starts with the individual taking responsibility. Please send this message to your friends and networks around the world so that once The Great Gathering becomes known around the globe we can then act and call on humanity to join us.

Change and true unity comes from the heart and being humble in our service to the earth and others. We are all connected; this gathering is to remind us that our lives on this earth are a gift to be honored.


We are all equal and we deserve to be heard. The Great Gathering gives us all a voice to say we want change and support change for our children. Through our hearts and unity we can make a difference. Let’s work on making this a reality in 2010—the year of change—by sharing this one idea. Together we will decide when The Great Gathering takes place.

This is how it begins.... with you.......

Sunday, December 20, 2009

American Survivalist


In today’s environment it’s hard to know what Emergency may occur and disrupt our daily lives. With the different kinds of challenges we may have to face, wouldn’t it be better to be ready just in case.

We hear on the news daily about some disaster happening in the world. From earthquakes, wild fires, flooding, tornados, hurricanes, terrorism. This is a slogan I heard a while back that goes, "It’s better to be years early than to be a minute too late". Because once something happens, you most likely will not be able to get prepared. It Will be Too Late. Are you willing to risk the safety of your family?

At American Survivalist we believe that it is part of our heritage to be ready and watchful for any kind of emergency in our Communities, our State, and our Country. This country has a lot of history that of which it was founded on and now the next chapter is about to be written.

Surviving any Emergency is a task that can wear down a person’s ability to properly take care of themselves and their families. Having the ability to adjust and adapt is a skill that must be taught and is somewhat in our nature.

With the threat of our way of life in jeopardy we must take action to be properly prepared in case of any kind of emergency.

Wednesday, December 16, 2009

Pole Beans Are Good For Survival


Beans are sensitive to cold temperatures and frost. They should be planted after all danger of frost is past in the spring. If the soil has warmed before the average last-frost date, an early planting may be made a week to 10 days before this date. You can assure yourself a continuous supply of snap beans by planting every 2 to 4 weeks until early August.
Plant seeds of all varieties one inch deep. Plant seeds of pole beans 4 to 6 inches apart in rows 30 to 36 inches apart along trellis, netting, fence, or poles; or in hills (four to six seeds per hill) 30 inches apart, with 30 inches between rows.
Seeds of most varieties tend to crack and germinate poorly if the soil's moisture content is too high. For this reason, never soak bean seed before planting. Instead water just after planting or plant right before a heavy rain.
Beans have shallow roots and frequent shallow cultivation and hoeing are necessary to control small weeds and grasses. Because bean plants have fairly weak root systems, deep, close cultivation injures the plant roots, delays harvest and reduces yields.
Harvest when the pods are firm, crisp and fully elongated, but before the seed within the pod has developed significantly. Pick beans after the dew is off the plants, and they are thoroughly dry. Picking beans from wet plants can spread bean bacterial blight, a disease that seriously damages the plants. Be careful not to break the stems or branches, which are brittle on most bean varieties. The bean plant continues to form new flowers and produces more beans if pods are continually removed before the seeds mature.

Tuesday, December 15, 2009

Survival Foods


Natural disasters are a reality that the entire world deals with including hurricanes, floods, blizzards, and even simple short-term power outages. It is important to be prepared in the kitchen. Those who are used to severe weather storms most likely already have an emergency food plan in place. Find out what you can do to prepare your kitchen for natural disasters or any state of emergency with tips and recipes.
Disaster Survival Food Pantry Basics
You probably already stock most pantry basics needed to prepare for a disaster. Canned foods immediately come to mind, whether you can your own or purchase commercially-canned goods. Recent studies have found that modern canning methods can produce a product that is often even more nutritious than their fresh counterpart. Vegetables canned in a liquid are excellent to have on hand in case of a water shortage, as the liquid can be used in place of fresh water in your recipe. A variety of herbs and spices, as well as salt, are a necessity to doctor up shelf-stable foods or for whatever new creations your fertile mind may devise. Salt is also a nutritional necessity.

Cooking oil will be needed for frying foods or making a roux to thicken sauces and stews. Olive oil will be fine unrefrigerated for a few months, indefinitely in cool weather. Jarred mayonnaise is shelf-stable. You might want to stock up on small jars that can be used quickly. Although it has preservatives, it will separate after opening if not refrigerated or kept on ice.

Flour and baking mix will last for up to 1 year on the shelf while sugar, salt, and honey are everlasting as long as they are properly stored in sealed packages or waterproof containers.

Pastas, rice, and dried legumes have long shelf lives, but if your water supply is limited, they will do you no good. Dry cereals can be eaten without milk or with canned juice as a snack or a meal on the run, a sure kid-pleaser. Pasteurized milk is now available in boxes which will keep in your cupboards up to 6 months and come in handy for making a quick sauce. Powdered and evaporated canned milk are further backups.

Dehydrated onions and mushrooms, along with canned vegetable juices, are great for soups, stews, and dutch oven meals with the additional benefit of reducing the need for added salt due to the concentrated flavor. Dry soup bases and gravy mixes can also serve as a basis for soups and stews.

Canned meats and seafood can be used in cold or hot dishes. Processed cheese food and dry grated Parmesan and Romano cheeses are shelf-stable and can fill in for cheese flavor.

Wednesday, December 9, 2009

The Ultimate in Currency


There has been a lot in the news these days about the decline of the U.S. Dollar. Countries such as Russia and China have been pushing for a new world currency or a basket of currencies to replace the dollar as the worlds reserve currency.

Just this morning Brendan Murray of Bloomberg posted an article about this very problem. I'll quote a little from that article:


"President Barack Obama's effort to lead the world economic recovery by spending the U.S. out of its recession is undermining the dollar, triggering record commodities rallies as investors scour the globe for hard assets.

As threats of a financial meltdown fade, the currency is falling victim to an unprecedented budget deficit, near-zero interest rates and slow growth.

The dollar is down 10 percent against six trading partners' legal tender in Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner's first eight-and-a-half months, the sharpest drop for a new occupant of that office since the Reagan administration's James Baker persuaded world leaders to boost the deutsche mark and yen by debasing the dollar in 1985."

So what does this mean to you? Simply put, your money isn't worth as much as it used to be.
It can be so frustrating to know that you can work very hard, save up some money, then wake up the next morning and find out you can't buy that much with it. In short, you are being robbed.

Many people are hedging the risk of inflation by buying gold, and that may be a good decision. But in the end, even gold requires that you exchange it for the things you really need, and you can't eat it.



Yes my friends the ultimate way to protect your family against economic turmoil is with Food Storage. If you store food and water you are storing security for your family.

Freeze Dried Food can store for longer than 30 years. So when you are making your plans for financial security, please remember that Food Storage is the ultimate currency.

Monday, December 7, 2009

Pearl Harbor


Somehow I feel it is time to rally around the Flag. I lost a Greatuncle on that Battleship.

Friday, December 4, 2009

Cucumbers


Cucumber is a tender, warm-season vegetable that produces well when given proper care and protection. The vines of standard varieties grow rapidly and require substantial space. Vertical training methods and new dwarf varieties now allow cucumbers to be grown for slicing, salads and pickling, even in small garden plots.
When to Plant
Cucumbers are usually started by planting seeds directly in the garden. Plant after the danger of frost has passed, and the soil has warmed in the spring. Warm soil is necessary for germination of seeds and proper growth of plants. With ample soil moisture, cucumbers thrive in warm summer weather. A second planting for fall harvest may be made in mid- to late summer.

Cucumbers may be transplanted for extra-early yields. Sow two or three seeds in peat pots, peat pellets or other containers 3 to 4 weeks before the frost-free date. Thin to one plant per container. Plant transplants 1 to 2 feet apart in rows 5 to 6 feet apart when they have two to four true leaves. Do not allow transplants to get too large in containers or they will not transplant well. Like other vine crops, cucumbers do not transplant successfully when pulled as bare-root plants.


Spacing & Depth
Plant seeds 1/2 to 1 inch deep and thin the seedlings to one plant every 12 inches in the row or to three plants every 36 inches in the hill system. If you use transplants, plant them carefully in warm soil 12 inches apart in the row.


Care
Cucumber plants have shallow roots and require ample soil moisture at all stages of growth. When fruit begins setting and maturing, adequate moisture becomes especially critical. For best yields, incorporate compost or well-rotted manure before planting. Cucumbers respond to mulching with soil-warming plastic in early spring or organic materials in summer. Use of black plastic mulch warms the soil in the early season and can give significantly earlier yields, especially if combined with floating row covers.

Side-dress with nitrogen fertilizer when the plants begin to vine. Cucumber beetles should be controlled from the time that the young seedlings emerge from the soil.

In small gardens, the vines may be trained on a trellis or fence. When the long, burpless varieties are supported, the cucumbers hang free and develop straight fruits. Winds whipping the plants can make vertical training impractical. Wire cages also can be used for supporting the plants. Do not handle, harvest or work with the plants when they are wet.


Harvesting
Pick cucumbers at any stage of development before the seeds become hard. Cucumbers usually are eaten when immature. The best size depends upon the use and variety. They may be picked when they are no more than 2 inches long for pickles, 4 to 6 inches long for dills and 6 to 8 inches long for slicing varieties. A cucumber is of highest quality when it is uniformly green, firm and crisp. The large, burpless cucumbers should be 1 to 1 1/2 inches in diameter and up to 10 inches long. Some varieties can grow considerably larger. Do not allow cucumbers to turn yellow. Remove from the vine any missed fruits nearing ripeness so that the young fruits continue to develop. The cucumber fruit grows rapidly to harvest size and should be picked at least every other day.

Friday, November 27, 2009

Survival Gardening in Containers


You don't need a plot of land to grow fresh vegetables. Many vegetables lend themselves well to container gardening. With some thought to selecting bush or dwarf varieties, almost any vegetable can be adapted to growing in a pot. Vegetables that take up little space, such as carrots, radishes and lettuce, or crops that bear fruits over a long period of time, such as tomatoes and peppers, are perfect for container vegetable gardens.

What you can grow in a container vegetable garden is limited only by the size of the container and your imagination. How about a Summer Salad container? Plant a tomato, a cucumber and some parsley or chives all in a large (24-30") container. They grow well together and have the same water and sun requirements. By late summer they might not be very pretty, but they'll keep producing into the fall. This makes a great housewarming present, too.


Containers and Pots for Vegetable Gardens
Selecting Containers: Containers for your vegetable gardens can be almost anything: flower pots, pails, buckets, wire baskets, bushel baskets, wooden boxes, nursery flats, window planters, washtubs, strawberry pots, plastic bags, large food cans, or any number of other things.
Drainage: No matter what kind of container you choose for your vegetable garden, it should have holes at the base or in the bottom to permit drainage of excess water.

Color Considerations: You should be careful when using dark colored containers because they absorb heat which could possibly damage the plant roots. If you do use dark colored pots, try painting them a lighter color or shading just the container.

Size: The size of the container is important. For larger vegetables like tomatoes and eggplants, you should use a five gallon container for each plant. You can grow these plants in two gallon containers, however you need to give the plants considerably more attention.


Soil and Fertilizer
You can use soil in your container vegetable garden, but the synthetic mixes are much better. Peat-based mixes, containing peat and vermiculite, are excellent. They are relatively sterile and pH adjusted. They also allow the plants to get enough air and water. Mixing in one part compost to two parts planting mix will improve fertility.
Using a slow release or complete organic fertilizer at planting will keep your vegetables fed for the whole growing season.


Watering
Pots and containers always require more frequent watering than plants in the ground. As the season progresses and your plants mature, their root system will expand and require even more water. Don't wait until you see the plants wilting. Check your containers daily to judge the need for water.

Monday, November 23, 2009

How and Where you Start Getting Ready...


We always recommend that people start with a well prepared and possibly personalized 72-hour kit. This is a basic item that can be a starting point to prepare your family.

Each person in your family or home needs a 72-hour kit with food and water to last at least 3 days. You can personalize the kit by adding a change of clothes, and important documentation like birth certificates, a marriage license, or health records.

In a child's kit you can also add items that will keep them entertained, like a few of their favorite light weight toys, a coloring book and some crayons, or anything else that is lightweight and can easily fit into their pack along with the basic emergency preparedness items that should already be included.

Next is water. Water is one of the most overlooked items in emergency preparedness, but it is easily one of the most important. Water is one of the first things to become contaminated after a disaster, but it is essential to life.

How much water should you store? One gallon per person per day is the recommended amount. Death caused by dehydration can occur in 3 days or even less in hot weather.

Even if dehydration doesn't cause death it can have some serious consequences when you're vulnerable that will make surviving more of a challenge. Once those basic needs are efficiently taken care of, it is then appropriate to think about what would make your family comfortable.

You would not be able to hear newscasts or when emergency relief groups are in your area when your power is down. The perfect solution would be a hand crank or solar-generated radio. It would be impossible to use your cell phone when the telephone lines are down as well as power lines. In this case you would find a hand crank cell phone charger to be a life saver.

It would not be efficient to rely on scented candles to light your home in case of a black out. You might prefer light sticks for your children and a 115 hour ReadyCandle to light your kitchen.

Rotating your food storage is time consuming, inconvenient, and can add up after a few rotations. It's also hard to know exactly when to rotate which items, and making sure you use it all before the expiration date is pretty difficult to track.

All of The Ready Store's #10 cans of freeze-dried food last for 30 years and since they are freeze dried, that means they keep more nutrients, taste, and color than dehydrated food storage..The Ultimate Year Supply of Freeze-Dried Food covers all the basics and more, including breakfast, lunch, fruit, vegetables, dinner, and a side.

We have also recently added some dehydrated food to our menu if you wanted to add calories to your meal. These require cooking, more water, and take much longer to make, but they cost a little less.

Sunday, November 22, 2009

How Long do you Boil Water for it to be safe

I keep on hearing bad advice about boiling water to make it safe to drink. Having enough safe drinking water is of utmost importance to any survivor. Proper information is very important and for that reason I am writing this is to set the record straight.

Boiling Water is the Best Method

As some of us know, boiling water is surest and most effective method of destroying microorganisms including disease causing bacteria, viruses, protozoan’s, and parasites.

Modern filtering devices and the chemical treatment of water come in a poor distant second to the ancient and almost foolproof method of boiling water to make it safe to drink. And importantly to the survivor, the boiling of water requires no special apparatus, training, or difficult to find chemicals. The means to boil water for safe drinking are usually close at hand:

•A source of heat
•A vessel to hold the water.

How Long Should Water be Boiled

I am always hearing different amounts of time that water needs to be boiled to kill disease organisms. Recently I perused various publications put out by the government and trusted health organizations. What is glaringly obvious is they disagree on the length of time water should be boiled to make it safe to drink.
Common water boiling times that are stated include:

•“Boil water for 10 minutes” is a common statement
•“5-minutes of boiling” is also frequently heard
•“Boil the water for 20 minutes”. Would there be any left?
•“A rolling boil for 1 minute”. Is it enough?
•“When at high altitudes you need to boil water for twice as long”

Modern filtering devices and the chemical treatment of water come in a poor distant second to the ancient and almost foolproof method of boiling water to make it safe to drink. Which of the above statements are true? None. That’s right. Following any of the above advice for the boiling times of water is a big waste of fuel (and a waste of water if you are short on water cannot afford to lose any to evaporation).

Throughout the world whole forests have been cut down for firewood in order to boil drinking water. Hikers and mountaineers have used up precious fuel boiling water for inordinate amounts of time. In a survival situation you cannot afford to waste valuable resources and energy. With all the bad advice around, many thousands of trees and other fuels and a huge amount of effort have been wasted.

Correct Water Boiling Time:
The correct amount of time to boil water is 0 minutes. Thats right, zero minutes.

"According to the Wilderness Medical Society, water temperatures above 160° F (70° C) kill all pathogens within 30 minutes and above 185° F (85° C) within a few minutes. So in the time it takes for the water to reach the boiling point (212° F or 100° C) from 160° F (70° C), all pathogens will be killed, even at high altitude."

What is not well known is that contaminated water can be pasteurized at temperatures well below boiling. The fact is, with a water temperature of 160 to 165 degrees F (74 C) it takes just half an hour for all disease causing organisms to be inactivated. At 185 degrees this is cut to just a few minutes. By the time water hits its boiling point of 212 F (100 C) - plus or minus depending upon pressure or altitude - the water is safe. Even at high altitudes the time it takes for the water to reach a rolling boil and then cool means you can safely drink it.

Lacking a thermometer to measure water temperature, you only need to get your water to a rolling boil. By that point you know the water is hot enough and that the disease organisms in your water were destroyed quite some time earlier. End of story, turn off the heat. Stop wasting fuel. Let the water cool down. Your water is safe to drink!

Saturday, November 14, 2009

It’s time to get into Survivalist Mode


In today’s environment it’s hard to know what Emergency may occur and disrupt our daily lives. With the different kinds of challenges we may have to face, wouldn’t it be better to be ready just in case.

We hear on the news daily about some disaster happening in the world. From earthquakes, wild fires, flooding, tornados, hurricanes, terrorism. This is a slogan I heard a while back that goes, "It’s better to be years early than to be a minute too late". Because once something happens, you most likely will not be able to get prepared. It Will be Too Late. Are you willing to risk the safety of your family?

At American Survivalist we believe that it is part of our heritage to be ready and watchful for any kind of emergency in our Communities, our State, and our Country. This country has a lot of history that of which it was founded on and now the next chapter is about to be written. So what I say to you is how ready do you want to be. There is no getting ready when you are quarantined in your home.

Wednesday, November 11, 2009

Veterans Day


Today is a day of remembrance for all who have served and died for our country. And for those who are serving now in harm’s way. We should all stop for a moment and give thanks to those who enable us to live with the freedoms we still have.

Sunday, November 8, 2009

DELUXE “96” HOUR KIT


In emergency preparedness, a 72 hour kit is widely considered the first step in becoming prepared. Sitting in a closet or some other area close to the front door, it can be grabbed in a moment’s notice, should you have to depart your home with little or no warning. Two days ago, only a block from my house, a neighbor’s home caught fire at 3 AM. After getting everyone out, the fire hastily spread and quickly destroyed this family’s home. Everything inside it was totally destroyed. What did they have left? Only the pajamas on their backs. They lost literally everything. They didn’t even have shoes on their feet. They wish they’d had a good 96 hour kit. Fortunately, the whole community is pulling together for them. But not everyone is this lucky. Sometimes, whole communities are affected at the same time. This same tiny farming village back in 1978 had to be immediately evacuated for several days because of derailed and leaking butane cars. Before that, everyone here thought this was a place where disasters ‘never happened.’
Seventy-two hour kits would have been really handy then as well. It’s not necessary that you live in a tornado or hurricane alley to need a 96 hour kit. Every family needs one for the unexpected.

A deluxe “96” hour kit should contain all the essential things your family would need to take you through 4 days of being on your own. There’s a reason behind the length of time the kit’s contents should last. It generally takes the disaster relief agencies at least 3-4 days to move in and set up before offering assistance. Generally speaking, you’re on your own during this time. Depending on how bad the situation is, it could even be longer. Whether you start with our kit or put one together yourself from scratch, it’s important for your family’s welfare to have one. In any type of disaster things will be bad. Not having the necessities to sustain your life and the lives of your family members could turn an otherwise manageable problem into a personal cataclysm you could never recover from. Prepare now for life’s surprises.

Saturday, November 7, 2009

Are You Ready For Unexpected Power Outages?


If you have ever wanted to have an emergency “backup” system that supplies continuous electrical power, There is a now a completely portable (and ultra-high efficient) solar power generator which produces up to 1800 watts of household electricity on demand when you need it most. News of this “solar backup generator” (it’s the first “off-the-grid” breakthrough in 50 years) is spreading like wildfire all across the country!

You see, this solar generator is extremely powerful and yet very simple to use. It produces continuous electricity and runs with absolutely no noise whatsoever. It emits no fumes. But the best part about the solar generator is that it Generates Free Electricity!

The unit then stores the power for your use when you need it. We all face natural disasters, with hurricanes, tornadoes, snow and ice storms cutting off electrical power to millions of Americans each year.

Then there are man-made disasters and outages. Blackouts and rolling brownouts are becoming common in many parts of the United States as our politicians herd us off into third-world status. And never forget the possibility of a terrorist attack directed at a few of our nation’s power plants. Since the nation’s power grids are all “connected,” crippling one plant starts a cascading downward spiral of darkness.

Your neighbors will be clueless when it finally does happen, expecting the government to “do something” to get their precious cable TV back on. The truth is, we are extremely vulnerable to all kinds of meltdowns that can create temporary or even permanent electrical outages. That’s why if you are one of the few Americans that have eyes to see and ears to hear with respect to the hard times ahead. In fact, you can also expect rising electrical rates very soon, as promised by the new administration. That's why you need to Have A Backup System In Place!

To find out more Click Here

Wednesday, November 4, 2009

Learn how to do Canning at Home


To preserve foods by canning two things must be done. First, sufficient heat must be provided to destroy all microscopic life that will cause spoilage in food; and second a perfect seal must be made which will prevent the re-entrance of microorganisms. These problems of preventing spoilage have been practically solved by the improved methods of canning which are explained below.
Only the freshest of fruits and vegetables should be canned. Canning does not improve the taste of the product; it only preserves it for future use.
Methods of Canning

Open Kettle: This method involves cooking the product completely and pouring it into sterilized jars, using sterilized equipment throughout. The jars are then sealed and stored. The open kettle method is recommended only for preserves, pickles, and foods canned in thick syrup. For other foods use the following methods.

Cold Pack: Cold, raw foods are put into jars and covered with boiling-hot syrup, juice of water. (Tomatoes are pressed down in the jar so they are covered with their own juice.) Jars are partially or completely sealed, following manufactures directions. Jars are then processed in boiling water or in steam to simultaneously cook the food and sterilize the jars.

Hot Pack: Fruits and vegetables are preheated before packing causing shrinkage before food goes into jars. This is the preferred method as preheating the food before packing prevents “floating”, (especially with fruits) and assures a full pack. Processing time is also lessened when food is hot-packed.

To learn how click here

Saturday, October 31, 2009

5 Basic Survival Skills


Acquiring survival skills is an ongoing process that will last for your entire life. There is always more to learn and experience, which is part of the fun of being a survivor.

As your survival expertise grows the knowledge and abilities you gain are often useful in other areas. For example survivors prepare ahead of time, and they are experts in the art of ingenuity and inventiveness. Excellent attributes for anyone.

The possible environments and situations you could find yourself in are innumerable. Although each situation has its particular requirements for successfully surviving, in the final analysis it is mastery of five basic survival skills that are essential. Proficiency and preparedness in these 5 basic skills will give you the edge and put you on your way toward becoming a talented survivor.

First Basic Survival Skill - Fire

Knowing how to build a fire is the best survival skill you can have. Fire provides warmth, light, and comfort so you get on with the business of survival. Even if you do not have adequate clothing a good fire can allow you to survive in the coldest of environments.

Fire keeps away the creatures that go bump in the night and so you can have the peace of mind and rest you need. And that is not all. Fire will cook your food and purify your water, both excellent attributes when you want to stay healthy when potential disease causing organisms are lurking about. Fire will dry your clothing and even aid in the making of tools and keeping pesky insects at bay.

But even that is not all. Fire and smoke can be used for signaling very long distances.

Always have at least two, and preferably three, ways of making a fire at you immediate disposal. With waterproof matches, a butane lighter, and a magnesium fire starter or firesteel you should be able to create a fire anytime anywhere no matter how adverse the condtions.

So the lesson here is to learn the art of fire craft. Practice and become an expert. Your ability to create a fire is perhaps the most visible mark of an experienced survivor.

Second Basic Survival Skill - Shelter

Shelter protects your body from the outside elements. This includes heat, cold, rain, snow, the sun, and wind. It also protects you from insects and other creatures that seek to do you harm.

The survival expert has several layers of shelter to think about. The first layer of shelter is the clothing you choose to wear. Your clothing is of vital importance and must be wisely chosen according to the environment you are likely to find yourself in. Be sure to dress in layers in order to maximize your ability to adapt to changing conditions.

The next layer of shelter is the one you may have to build yourself, a lean-to or debris hut perhaps. This is only limited by your inventiveness and ingenuity. If the situation requires, your shelter can be insulated with whatever is at hand for the purpose. Being prepared, you may have a space blanket or tarp with you, in which case creating a shelter should be relatively easy.

Before you are in need of making a survival shelter, be sure to practice and experiment with a variety of materials and survival scenarios on a regular basis. Should the need arise you will be glad you did.

Third Basic Survival Skill - Signaling

Signaling allows you to make contact with people who can rescue you without having to be in actual physical contact with them. There are a variety of ways to signal for help. These include using fire and smoke, flashlights, bright colored clothing and other markers, reflective mirrors, whistles, and Personal Locator Beacons. Three of anything is considered a signal for help: 3 gunshots, 3 blows on a whistle, three sticks in the shape of a triangle.

In a pinch, your ingenuity in devising a way to signal potential help could very well save your life.

Fourth Basic Survival Skill - Food and Water

Whenever you plan an excursion be sure to always bring extra food and water. Having more on hand than you think you need will give you that extra measure of safety should something happened and you have to stay out longer than anticipated.

It is important that you know how to ration your water and food as well as find more in the environment in which you find yourself. You can go without food for a number of days, but living without water for even a few days will cause your efficiency to drop dramatically.

If at all possible, boil any water you find in order to kill disease organisms that may be in even the cleanest looking water. Filtering or chemically treating water is second best.

Fifth Basic Survival Skill - First Aid

Always bring along your first aid kit and a space blanket. Most injuries you are likely to encounter in the wilderness are relatively minor scrapes, cuts, bruises, and burns. Larger injuries are going to need better facilities than that which you have at your disposal, which means you will need outside help.

Panic is your number one enemy when you are in any emergency situation, be it injured, lost, or stranded. What you need in these situations is first aid for the mind.

STOP Think:
Sit
Think
Observe
Plan

Friday, October 30, 2009

Practice Your Survival Skills


The subject of survival is a big topic and the beginner, as well as the more experienced, may sometimes feel overwhelmed by the sheer volume of material that one can learn.

I always recommend frequenting the several excellent survival forums and message boards that are on the Internet. These are run by friendly experienced people well versed in the field of survival. Participants in these survival forums are skilled in everything from bushcraft to firecraft to handicraft. They take great pride and pleasure in helping anyone. Often the survival discussions are lively and informative. If you are interested in learning more about survival, you will be welcomed with open arms into the survival community.

In addition there are a number of excellent books and magazines that cover the topic of survival. The basic ways of surviving have not always changed much over hundreds of years, and very old outdoor survival books contain nuggets of wisdom that even modern day survivors can use.

But it is not enough to read survival books and visit online survival forums. You have to get out there and practice your survival skills and survival gear. Set up a lean-to, build a debris hut, build a fire, find water. Test your skills in a variety of conditions and with a variety of materials. Make sure you would be able to do these very same things while injured or when it is wet or cold or blazingly hot.

The more you learn about survival techniques the more you realize how much there is to learn. When faced with a large task it is often easier to break it down into bite sized chunks. Survival experts have found through experience that the foundation of survival rests on five basic survival skills. Master these 5 basic survival skills and you are well on your way to being an expert survivor yourself. I will post these 5 skills next.

So discuss, read, and practice. That is the way of becoming a survival expert.

Tuesday, October 27, 2009

Do it yourself skills


Do-it-yourself skills are on their way out for many people, who prefer to have someone else do the dirty work. This has a direct effect on our collective ability to survive disasters.

A large part of survival is the ability to take charge of the situation and do what needs to be done in order to make it through another day. Often this is as simple as knowing how change the flat tire on a vehicle, or do some basic repairs to gear you are depending on. Like sharpening a survival knife, cleaning a rifle, or making a survival kit.

Every day we are losing touch with do it yourself skills, preferring instead to specialize completely into the one small thing from which we make a living. All that other stuff we can pay someone else to do.

When times are good your computer skills, or if you are flipping burgers your ability to churn ‘em out in numbers, may seem like the ticket to a good life. But should TSHTF you are going to find you cannot eat CD’s and your free fast food supply is nowhere to be found.

But it goes beyond that. Simply doing as many things as possible yourself – from plumbing to electrical to car repairs, gardening, and even fishing to putting some protein on the table – will give you a wide array of skill sets and problem solving skills no school can ever teach you.

When things go bad and a large scale survival situation occurs you are going to be in a much better position to survive if you are somewhat of a jack of all trades.

Emergency preparedness is usually pretty much a do it yourself skill if done right. Of course there are those who think all they have to do is pay for someone else to put together a survival kit or year’s supply of food, and they have got it made. Rest assured this way of thinking will serve them ill should they suddenly need this survival gear, possibly of dubious quality, without having the proper training and experience to use it.

Sunday, October 25, 2009

The Ultimate Currency


There has been a lot in the news these days about the decline of the U.S. Dollar. Countries such as Russia and China have been pushing for a new world currency or a basket of currencies to replace the dollar as the worlds reserve currency.

Just this morning Brendan Murray of Bloomberg posted an article about this very problem. I'll quote a little from that article:


"President Barack Obama's effort to lead the world economic recovery by spending the U.S. out of its recession is undermining the dollar, triggering record commodities rallies as investors scour the globe for hard assets.

As threats of a financial meltdown fade, the currency is falling victim to an unprecedented budget deficit, near-zero interest rates and slow growth.

The dollar is down 10 percent against six trading partners' legal tender in Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner's first eight-and-a-half months, the sharpest drop for a new occupant of that office since the Reagan administration's James Baker persuaded world leaders to boost the deutsche mark and yen by debasing the dollar in 1985."

So what does this mean to you? Simply put, your money isn't worth as much as it used to be.
It can be so frustrating to know that you can work very hard, save up some money, then wake up the next morning and find out you can't buy that much with it. In short, you are being robbed.

Many people are hedging the risk of inflation by buying gold, and that may be a good decision. But in the end, even gold requires that you exchange it for the things you really need, and you can't eat it.


Yes my friends the ultimate way to protect your family against economic turmoil is with Food Storage. If you store food and water you are storing security for your family.

Freeze Dried Food can store for longer than 30 years. So when you are making your plans for financial security, please remember that Food Storage is the ultimate currency.

Saturday, October 24, 2009

P-38 and P51 Can Openers


Known as a "John Wayne" by the U.S. Marine Corps because the actor was shown in a training film opening a can of K-Rations, the can opener is pocket-sized (approximately 1.5 inches, 38mm, in length) and consists of a short metal blade that serves as a handle (which doubles as a flat-blade screwdriver), with a small, hinged metal tooth that folds out to pierce the can lid. A notch just under the hinge point keeps the opener hooked around the rim of the can as the device is "walked" around to cut the lid out. A larger version called the P-51 is somewhat easier to operate.

Official military designations for the P-38 include 'US ARMY POCKET CAN OPENER' and 'OPENER, CAN, HAND, FOLDING, TYPE I'. As with some other military terms (e.g. jeep), the origin of the term is not known with certainty; the P-38 opener coincidentally shares a designation with the P-38 'Lightning' fighter plane, which could allude to its fast performance. However, the P-51 can opener, while larger and easier to use than the P-38 can opener, also has a fighter plane namesake in the P-51, which is faster and smaller than the P-38 fighter. One rumored explanation for the origin of the name is that the P-38 is approximately 38 mm (1.5 in) long. This explanation also holds for the P-51, which measures approximately 51 mm (2.0 in) in length. U.S. Army sources, however, indicate that the origin of the name is rooted in the 38 punctures around the circumference of a C-ration can required for opening.

Thursday, October 22, 2009

Some of the Best Survival Equipment

When optimizing your survival gear there is nothing more critical than the clothing you choose to wear. Proper clothing is the foundation on which you build the structure of your outdoor gear and survival preparation.
From head to toe, your clothing must be fully functional and able to protect you from all that nature and man, accident and circumstance may throw at you. When you think about it, that a tall order.

In general we as modern humans tend to take clothing to lightly. We throw on anything that is fashionable and handy. Then we head out the door into our dry and warm vehicles to spend the day in a warm and dry office. We hunt our food in supermarkets warmed or cooled for our comfort and travel enclosed in artificial environments of car, bus, plane or train. Only for brief minutes are we exposed to the weather as we run from one climate controlled space to the other, our only concession to the weather as feeble as a newspaper over ones head when it is raining or turning our backs against a biting gale.

Many people do not have the knowledge and experience to choose the right clothing for surviving when artificial climate controlled spaces are nowhere to found. That is why they die in the wilderness when survival would have been easy for survivors like us.

Saturday, October 17, 2009

Year Supply of Freeze Dried Food - #10 CANS


For those who want a 100% COMPLETE year's worth of gourmet tasting foods, this superior year supply was made for you. You get 3 meals per day plus vegetables and fruits each day for 365 days for one person! Nothing was held back, in fact, we included some of every main course entree available. Now you and your family can enjoy fast, delicious tasting meals anytime with no preparation or cooking! Just add water and eat. Like all Saratoga Farms™ and Mountain House™ #10 cans, this unit will store for up to 30 years. This Ultimate Year Supply comes with 126 #10 cans packed into 21 easy to store cases.

● No cooking or preparation! Just add water.
● 126 #10 cans that come in 7 large boxes containing 21 easy to store cases.
● 100% Freeze-Dried food for the highest quality and shelf life available.
● Up to a 30 Year Shelf-Life!
● Trusted gourmet quality from the Saratoga Farms and Mountain House brands!

Saratoga Farms™ and Mountain House™ freeze-dried foods are second to none in terms of quality and taste. Freeze-Dried foods offer many advantages over dehydrated foods. To Begin with they taste much better because through the freeze-drying process the foods retain their taste, texture, and shape of fresh frozen foods. In addition, freeze-drying locks in the freshness, vitamins, nutrients, color, and aroma of fresh frozen foods while providing the shelf-stable convenience of canned and dehydrated foods.

All the contents of our Saratoga Farms™ and Mountain House™ food storage units are 100% FREEZE-DRIED FOOD with a 30-YEAR SHELF LIFE. Other companies will sell an ""Ultimate"" Year Supply and add additional cans of dehydrated food with high sugar content, inferior quality and a significantly shorter shelf life to increase the number of cans so they can sell it at a higher price. Those additional cans of dehydrated food add bulk, but lack the quality, shelf-life, and nutritional value that freeze-dried food provides you.

Thursday, October 15, 2009

168-Piece Survival First Aid Kit


Whatever comes you're ready. Our first aid supplies are combined with basic survival components in this truly comprehensive kit. The 167-pieces have been thoughtfully chosen and arranged in a durable, ballistic nylon carry case.

● Includes medicine & antiseptics, bandages, dressings, injury treatment, and references.
● Ballistic nylon carry case.
● Treats cuts and scrapes, pain and swelling, and burns.
● Recommended by health care professionals.
● Trusted quality from First Aid Only - in business for 20 years!

Sunday, October 11, 2009

Foraging to Survive

One of my favorite techniques for finding survival food when practicing survival skills is what I call “Survival Foraging on the Move”. This simple but effective method requires the survivor to expend little additional energy yet can produce a bountiful harvest of very nutritious wild edibles. The shear amount of survival food you can conjure up with very little extra effort is sometimes more than you can possibly eat!

The main criteria for the Survival Foraging on the Move method are:

1. You are attempting to walk from point A to point B, perhaps toward help.
2. That the wild foods you gather be on the direct route of travel and require a minimum of time and effort for acquisition.
3. You do not veer off your chosen path to chase after anything fleeing, and thereby use up precious energy and time that may become wasted effort.
4. You throw away any food prejudices you may have. Remember, insects and other creepy crawlies are being used as food on a daily basis by many cultures throughout the world. Do not put your survival at risk due to ignorance.

Hungry Survivor

The idea for successful survival foraging is to keep a constant eye out for easy-to-get wild edibles no matter how small or of what type (animal, insect, or plant) they might be. Stick to your route and pause momentarily to collect edibles of opportunity as you go. This means that anything you harvest is almost free energy since you have to walk the route anyway and you will need occasional rest breaks that the collection of food will conveniently provide.
Practicing Survival Foraging
On a recent survival skills trip I decided to practice Survival Foraging on the Move. As I walked through the forest for several miles toward my intended destination I continually scanned my immediate surroundings for anything I might be able to add to the cooking pot with only minimal effort.

Edible Clover

The first edible wild food I chanced upon was a bed of woods sorrel. This clover like plant prefers to grow in cooler, damp areas of the forest. It is an excellent salad green with a delicious lemony flavor that tastes great in soups and stews. Though low on calories as are many vegetables, this wild edible plant contains many important nutrients that will help your body maintain and heal itself.

Grasshopper

In short order I collected about a 1/4 liter or 1/4 quart of woods sorrel and then was on my way. The brief pause while collecting the woods sorrel was a welcome break and I resumed my walk refreshed. This is an important part of Survival Foraging on the Move: the short breaks you take while gathering the food items provide the necessary rest-stops as you travel over long distances.

Slugs are Good Survival Food

Next up on the wild foods survival menu was a common slug inching across a damp rock. It took little effort to merely stoop down and pick it up, hardly breaking my stride. Along the route of march I came upon ten or twelve of his kind, all of which went into the survival food larder.

Ants and Ant Pupae

My technique for dealing wild survival foods that can run, wiggle, or fly is to put them into a container that has several inches of water in it. This immobilizes the creatures so that they cannot escape when I open the cover to add more.
Eat the Bugs that Eat You!
As I continued walking there was an annoying buzz around my head. Two deer flies were attempting to make a meal of me, but I captured them as they landed on my arm. Like most insects flies are an excellent source of fats and protein. Though about the size of a large housefly I put them into the container with the slugs. In a survival situation do not pass up any source of free food. It all adds up and may help you live another day.

Indian Cucumber

When your survival is at stake you need to put aside any preconceived notions as to what you can and cannot eat. People the world over eat insects as a matter of course and you can too. The way I see it, if you can eat a clam (a worm in a shell that fliter feeds from sewerage) , then you can eat anything.
Eating Grasshoppers - Excellent Survival Food
Eventually I came upon a little clearing in the woods. As I walked through the tall grass dozens of large grasshoppers were jumping away from me. It was like herding miniature livestock. Some of these grasshoppers were almost as large as my little finger and quite easy to catch because the cool weather made them somewhat lethargic.

Because the grasshoppers were an easy to gather source of high protein and fat energy, I took a five minute break and captured seven or eight of this excellent survival food.

Survival Starches


Back in the deep dark forest I continued on. Here and there I harvested an Indian Cucumber. The Indian Cucumber plant is easily identifiable and has a starchy root that is something between a cucumber and a potato. This nutritious root is easily harvested with a short digging stick. It only takes a few seconds to extract the root using the narrow end of my tomahawk.
Pausing here and there along my journey, I was able to dig up a dozen or more Indian Cucumber roots. This provided me with a handful of excellent survival food high in starch and at little cost in terms of time or energy expended.
Ants are Good Survival Food Snacks
The next survival food I came upon was a nest of black ants that had created a mound on the surface of the ground. A bear had already harvested the nest, and the ants were busy rebuilding. Following the bears method, I dug into the nest with a swipe of the tomahawk to expose a swarm of angry ants and ant pupae, both of which I gathered and put into the jug of water. It was easy to capture the ants as they attacked my hand but were too small to do anything but give a light pinch.


Wood Sorrell

Be warned that some species of ants have the ability to sting or bite and can be very dangerous especially in large numbers. Even so, all species of ants are edible.

Pine Needles are Nutritious

Next up on the menu was a white pine tree (pinus strobus) the needles of which are very high in vitamin C and other nutrients. It was an easy matter to gather a handful of its green needles.
Vitamin C is a very important nutrient for the survivor as it is essential for the recovery process and the healing of wounds. The Survival Topic A Native American Cure for Scurvy has an historical account related to this.
In a real survival situation I could also strip off the edible inner bark of the pine tree, which comes off in thick sheets quite easily. This of course would kill the tree and so is not a good thing to do unless absolutely necessary. When boiled this bark makes a very good survival food that Indians of my area once ate during times of famine.

Saturday, October 10, 2009

MSR Reactor™ Emergency Stove


State of the art cookware and revolutionary stove design combine to create the fastest, most fuel efficient stove system ever. The Reactor's radiant burner is enclosed by a unique heat exchanger for unmatched performance in windy conditions while an advanced pressure regulator provides optimal heat output over the life of each fuel canister. Stove and fuel canister stow inside of the high-efficiency 1.7 liter pot that's great for everything from solo trips to cooking for groups of up to three people. A collapsible handle locks the unique see-thru lid in place for safe and easy transport.

• Unrivaled Boil Time - Boil 1 liter of water in just 3 minutes
• Maximum Efficiency - Tri-sectional clip protects flame in light wind gusts.
• Unmatched Wind Protection - Total protection in even the windiest conditions.
• Integrated System - State-of-the-art stove and high-efficiency pot are combined into one.
• Simple, lightening-fast operation - No need for priming, pressurizing or maintenance.
Trusted quality from the MSR brand.

Thursday, October 8, 2009

Solar Powered Survival Radio


I bought one of these radios and it works great. I am going to buy another just for backup.
Solar Powered Survival Radio is both dynamo & solar powered and is rugged enough to help you through any disaster! This unit has everything you need in an emergency communication and lighting device including ALL of the incredible features below packed into one extremely useful device.

• Includes Light, radio, cellphone charge and more.
• Perfect for power outages and emergency situations.
• All-in-one solution with lighting and communication options in one unit.
• Trusted quality from Kaito brand.

Tuesday, October 6, 2009

When you need to grab and go this is one handy package to have


Our most complete kit! You can have the peace-of-mind and security you want during an emergency knowing that your kit has high-quality components that will aid you and your loved ones during an emergency.

• Includes food & water, light & communication, warmth & shelter, tools, personal care, and first aid.
• Most complete and thorough kit supplies.
• Internal frame backpack provides space and durability.

Product Features
Supply Type: Grab-n-Go
Supply Duration: 1-Week
Enclosure Type: Backpack
Needs Supplied: Warmth & Shelter, Water & Hydration, Food & Nutrition, Sanitation & Hygiene, First Aid & Medical, Light & Communication, Cooking & Fuel, Tools & Supplies
Situational Usage: Auto, Biological, Earthquake, Electrical, Fire, Flood, Hurricane, Medical, Nuclear, Storm, Tornado
Shelf Life: 5-10 Years
Brand: The Ready Store
Kit Supplies: Food/Water/Equipment
Age Group: Adult
Persons: 4-Person

Monday, October 5, 2009

6-Month Supply of Freeze Dried Food - #10 CANS


For those who want a 100% COMPLETE six month's worth of gourmet tasting foods, this superior 6-month supply was made for you. You get 3 meals per day plus vegetables and fruits each day for 6 months for one person! Nothing was held back. Now you and your family can enjoy fast, delicious tasting meals anytime with no preparation or cooking! Just add water and eat. Like all Saratoga Farms™ and Mountain House™ #10 cans, this unit will store for up to 30 years. This Ultimate Year Supply comes with 66 #10 cans packed into 11 easy to store cases.

● No cooking or preparation! Just add water.
● 66 #10 cans that come in 11 easy to store cases.
● 100% Freeze-Dried food for the highest quality and shelf life available.
● Up to a 30 Year Shelf-Life!
● Trusted gourmet quality from the Saratoga Farms and Mountain House brands!

Saratoga Farms™ and Mountain House™ freeze-dried foods are second to none in terms of quality and taste. Freeze-Dried foods offer many advantages over dehydrated foods. To Begin with they taste much better because through the freeze-drying process the foods retain their taste, texture, and shape of fresh frozen foods. In addition, freeze-drying locks in the freshness, vitamins, nutrients, color, and aroma of fresh frozen foods while providing the shelf-stable convenience of canned and dehydrated foods.

All the contents of our Saratoga Farms™ and Mountain House™ food storage units are 100% FREEZE-DRIED FOOD with a 30-YEAR SHELF LIFE. Other companies will sell a "Ultimate" 6-month supply and add additional cans of dehydrated food with high sugar content, inferior quality and a significantly shorter shelf life to increase the number of cans so they can sell it at a higher price. Those additional cans of dehydrated food add bulk, but lack the quality, shelf-life, and nutritional value that freeze-dried food provides you.

Sunday, October 4, 2009

½ Acre Premium Garden Seeds - #10 CAN


Our premium non-hybrid, non-GMO, open pollinated garden seeds are a must for your emergency supplies. Each seed variety is hermetically sealed in triple foil Mylar bags and then sealed again inside our super tough #10 can to give you the longest shelf life possible. Produced by one of our nation's top seed companies, these non-hybrid seeds will give you reliable, fresh vegetables when you need it the most. Each can comes with 16 individual seed pouches.

These are not the same type of seeds that you buy at your local garden store. Unlike most seeds you buy locally, these seeds are non-hybrid, which means that you can reuse the seeds each year giving you an endless supply of fresh, nutritious vegetables. Because of their unique qualities and packaging, these seeds can be very difficult to come by. Buy yours today!

Saturday, October 3, 2009

Filling a Bug Out Bag


A bug out bag is a bag, or backpack, that you can grab in an emergency. If you have to unexpectedly leave your home, for several days, one of these bags, loaded with essential supplies, is a great item to take with you. Although you can personalize the items in your bug out bag, there are some basics that everyone should include in theirs.
Supplies to Keep You Warm
Step 1
Start with a sturdy backpack. A backpack is the easiest way to store a large amount of supplies in a way that is convenient to grab quickly and carry easily during an emergency. A high quality pack will ensure that your gear stays protected.
Step 2
Roll up a hooded sweater or fleece jacket and tuck in the bottom of your bag. A sweater or jacket will keep you warm, and a hood is essential for retaining your body heat, or to use as a pillow if you end up sleeping on the ground. A space blanket is also a good addition for keeping warm on cold days or nights.
Step 3
Tuck in a small tent. If a situation calls for you to use your bug out bag, you may need to sleep outside for several nights. Even a small pup tent will provide adequate shelter during inclement weather.
Step 4
Include matches and a lighter. Store your matches in a waterproof container and add a lighter to your bag. Soak cotton balls in lighter fluid and pack them in a zip close plastic bag, these will help you start a fire, even in wet weather.
Food Supplies
Step 1
Feed yourself. Whether you choose freeze-dried camping food or military MREs, you need to include food in your bug out bag. If you use military MREs, you can manage on one MRE per day. Pack three day's worth of food in your bag.
Step 2
Include plenty of water. You will need to bring a minimum of one quart of water per person per day; plan for at least three days. Include a portable water filter and water purification tablets in your pack so you can replenish your supply when necessary.
Step 3
Pack a fish hook or two and some fishing line in a small tin container or empty film canister. You can usually find a worm or an insect to use as bait, allowing you the option of adding some fresh fish to your diet.
Step 4
Add a knife, a small camp stove and a metal mug or pot. These will help in all of your meal preparations.

Supplies to Keep You Comfortable
Step 1
Add a set of clean underwear. If you have to rough it for several days, nothing feels better than changing your underwear. This will take up very little space in your bug out bag and be good for your morale.
Step 2
Include personal hygiene items. You will need to bring a travel-sized toothbrush and toothpaste, soap in a water-tight container, toilet paper and hand sanitizer.
Step 3
Add some cold hard cash to your bug out bag supplies. Generally, cash is advised to have because, during many emergency situations, ATMs and banks are not working/or open.
Step 4
Stock a well-supplied first aid kit and keep in your bug out bag. Your kit should include latex gloves, sterile dressings, antibiotic ointment, burn ointment, adhesive bandages, a thermometer, your prescription medications and any medical supplies you use on a regular basis.
Step 5
Add a flashlight, a small radio and extra batteries to your bug out bag and you are now ready for any emergency.

Wednesday, September 30, 2009

What can I do to help with the environment?



Most people want to do something to help with the environment, or go green as the popular term suggests. But they do not know what they can do about it. Well I have some possible answers I would like to share with you. Gardening can be done in so many ways that if we use only some of them we can have a big impact on the environment around us. Take vertical gardening for instance we could plant some ivy at the base of a wall and watch these beautiful plants grow up the wall.

Not only are you helping with energy costs for the building that the vines are growing on but you are also cleaning the air we breathe, and also we are taking a plain wall and make it functional like a piece of art work, and is soothing to the eye. Not only are you helping with the environment, you can take pride in growing something and watch how it grows and matures into a beautiful plant. This is just one of many ways to contribute to the effort to help the planet and ourselves to have a better way of life.

Tuesday, September 29, 2009

Ultimate First Responder First Aid Kit - HARD CASE


Product Description
Our most comprehensive kit. All components are of the highest possible quality and chosen specifically to keep you prepared for unexpected first aid emergencies. Components are arranged in three compartmental trays to keep supplies easily accessible.

● Includes medicine & antiseptics, bandages, dressings, injury treatment, and references.
● Three compartmental trays to keep supplies easily accessible.
● Treats cuts and scrapes, pain and swelling, and burns.
● Recommended by health care professionals.
● Trusted quality from First Aid Only - in business for 20 years!

We always focus on the QUALITY of our products first, rather than quantity because we want you to get the best value for your hard-earned money.

Product Features Supply Type: Grab-n-Go
Supply Duration: Indefinite
Needs Supplied: First Aid & Medical
Situational Usage: Auto, Biological, Earthquake, Electrical, Fire, Flood, Hurricane, Medical, Nuclear, Storm, Tornado
Shelf Life: Indefinite
Brand: First Aid Only
Product Contents(25) 3/4"x3" Adhesive plastic bandages
(30) 1"x3" Fabric bandages
(2) Knuckle fabric bandages
(2) Large fingertip fabric bandages
(4) 2"x4" Elbow & knee plastic bandages
(10) 3/8"x1-1/2" Junior plastic bandages
(5) 1-1/2"x1-1/2" Patch plastic bandages
(4) Medium butterfly wound closures
(4) Large butterfly wound closures
(6) 3M 2-3/8"x4" Waterproof knee & elbow bandages
(10) 3M 1-1/16"x2-1/4" Waterproof bandages
(3) 2"x3" Non-stick pads
(3) 3"x4" Non-stick pads
(8) 2"x2" Gauze dressing pads
(4) 3"x3" Gauze dressing pads
(4) 4"x4" Gauze dressing pads
(4) 3M Tegaderm transparent dressings
(1) 3M Tegaderm transparent dressing instructions
(4) 5"x9" Trauma pads
(2) 2" Conforming gauze roll bandages
(2) 3" Conforming gauze roll bandages
(2) 36" Triangular sling/bandage, w/2 safety pins
(4) Aspirin tablets
(4) Ibuprofen tablets
(8) Extra-strength non-aspirin tablets
(4) Antacid tablets
(4) Antihistamine tablets
(24) Alcohol cleansing pads
(18) Antiseptic cleansing wipes (sting free)
(3) Castile soap towelettes
(1) Triple antibiotic ointment, 1/2 oz.
(2) Burn relief packs, 3.5 gm.
(9) Insect sting relief pads
(6) Povidone-iodine infection control wipes
(1) Antiseptic spray, 3 oz. aerosol
(1) 3"x5 yd. Elastic bandage wrap, w/2 fasteners, latex free
(1) 3M 3/4"x7 yd. Clear first aid tape roll
(1) 3M 1"x15 yd. Waterproof first aid tape roll
(2) 6"x9" Instant cold compresses
(1) 4"x6" Hot/cold reusable compress
(2) Sterile eye pads
(1) Eye wash, 4 oz.
(1) CPR one-way valve faceshield, latex free
(1) 52"x84" Emergency blanket
(3) 6"x11/16" Finger splints
(2) Medium #2 safety pins
(6) 3" Cotton tipped applicators, sterile
(1) Digital thermometer
(1) Medication canister
(4) Exam quality vinyl gloves
(1) Deluxe scissors, stainless steel
(1) Deluxe tweezers, stainless steel
(2) 1 oz Hand Sanitizers
(1) Splinter-Out, 10 per small hinged plastic case
(1) 3-3/4Ggx27Gg Rolled Wire Splint
(1) 40 pg. First aid guide

Here is where you can find this

Monday, September 28, 2009

DELUXE Emergency Bucket Kit



This will take care of some of your sanitation needs.

Provides food, water, warmth, sanitation, light, communication, first aid & more for 20 people all packed in 2 sturdy 5 gallon buckets with Port-a-Potty Lids.

• Includes food & water, light & communication, warmth & shelter, tools, personal care, and first aid.
• Buckets double as containers and Port-a-Potty.
• Includes convenient to carry duffel bag providing additional storage space.

Sunday, September 27, 2009

Harding off Seedlings


Transplants that have been raised indoors are soft, and must get used to sun, wind and rain. It is best to let them “harden off” gradually for several days before planting in the garden.

Move the trays of transplants outdoors to a sheltered, shady place out of the wind. Keep them well watered. If they wilt anyway, bring them back inside until they perk up again. Be sure to bring them back indoors in the evening.

After two days, leaves and stems should be stronger. Move transplants to a half-sun location for 2 more days. When they are tough enough to go through the day without wilting, it’s time to plant them in the garden or container.

Saturday, September 26, 2009

Potatoes

Potatoes are a staple in the diet of many people all over the world. Potatoes are a nutritious, versatile vegetable, and they’re very easy to grow. But before you run out to the garden with your tiller and hoe, there are a few things you should know about planting potatoes.

Do not plant potatoes too early, while the ground is still frozen. If the ground is too cold and wet, the seed potatoes will delay sprouting until the growing conditions are more favorable. This is usually in early March to late April, depending on the climate. Potatoes do tolerate cool soil and a light frost, but not much growth will take place until the soil warms up a bit.

You won’t find potato seedlings or packets of potato seeds for sale at your local garden center. Instead, potatoes are grown from seed potatoes. A seed potato is nothing more than an ordinary potato, with at least one “eye”. The “eye” is the small white growth on the potato that you usually take off when preparing potatoes to cook.

Way back when, before supermarkets, when gardens supplied most of the food put on the table, the last of the potatoes in the storage bin come spring were used for seed potatoes. Wise gardeners set aside their blemish-free, healthiest potatoes for seed. Seed potatoes can be planted whole, or they may be cut into pieces with at least one eye per piece. Seed potatoes with more eyes will grow to produce a larger quantity of potatoes but the potatoes will generally be smaller. Seed potatoes with fewer eyes will produce fewer potatoes, but those potatoes will tend to be larger.

This allows the cuts to heal over slightly, which helps to prevent soil-borne diseases from infecting your potato crop. Always choose seed potatoes that are free from blemishes.
Plant your whole or cut seed potatoes two to three inches deep in good, rich soil. Rows of potatoes should be about three feet apart and the potatoes within the row should be planted If you choose to cut your seed potatoes into smaller pieces, divide them a day prior to twelve inches apart. If your potato crop has suffered from scab in the past, toss a small handful of dry pine needles in the holes beneath your seed potatoes. Along with moving your potatoes to a different section of the garden each year, this will help prevent further scab infection. Potato scab appears as rough patches on the skin of the potatoes.

Depending on the warmth of the soil, potato plants will begin to emerge from the soil anywhere from one to three weeks after planting. When the plants are about a foot tall, use your hoe to mound six to eight inches of soil continuously along the entire row of plants. This is called hilling. Hilling ensures that the potatoes will grow deeply under the soil, away from sunlight which would cause them to become green. Potatoes that suffer from greening will be bitter and the inedible green parts must be discarded.
Keep the potato plants evenly watered while they are growing. A dry period followed by a rainy spell will cause some potato varieties to develop a hollow core.

Another potential problem with potatoes is the potato beetle. The larvae and adult beetles will feed on the potato foliage, and a heavy infestation can damage the foliage enough to reduce your harvest considerably. Watch for the beetle’s yellow eggs on the undersides of leaves and crush the clusters whenever you see them. Larvae are a deep orange color with a row of black spots on both sides, while the adults are a paler orange with black stripes on the body and black spots on the head. The larvae and adults can be picked off the leaves and crushed if there are only a few. An infestation can also be controlled with Bacillus thuringiensis, or Bt. Bt is an organic control that is very safe to use. Look for Bt that is specifically for potato beetles. It is sold in many garden catalogs and garden centers.

Once your potato plants have bloomed, you can begin to harvest small “new” potatoes. Depending on the variety of potatoes you’re growing, this is about eight weeks after planting. In the fall, after the foliage has begun to dry and die back, the entire crop can be dug. Before storing them in a cool, dry and dark place, make sure the surface of your freshly dug spuds has dried a bit. Spread them out in a dry spot out of direct sun, such as a garage or shed, for a day or two before putting them in storage.

Friday, September 25, 2009

American Survivalist



In today’s environment it’s hard to know what Emergency may occur and disrupt our daily lives. With the different kinds of challenges we may have to face, wouldn’t it be better to be ready just in case.

We hear on the news daily about some disaster happening in the world. From earthquakes, wild fires, flooding, tornados, hurricanes, terrorism. This is a slogan I heard a while back that goes, "It’s better to be years early than to be a minute too late". Because once something happens, you most likely will not be able to get prepared. It Will be Too Late. Are you willing to risk the safety of your family.

At American Survivalist website we believe that it is part of our heritage to be ready and watchful for any kind of emergency in our Communities, our State, and our Country. This country has a lot of history that of which it was founded on and now the next chapter is about to be written.

Surviving any Emergency is a task that can wear down a person’s ability to properly take care of themselves and their families. Having the ability to adjust and adapt is a skill that must be taught and is somewhat in our nature.

Thursday, September 24, 2009

Alert

Save your own life, Don't take any Flu Shots
Watch Alex Jones take on flu shots

For more information contact Spirit Wins.org and leave a message.

Monday, September 21, 2009

It’s Almost too Late


Ya know I started this blog as kind of a passing fancy because I am a believer in surviving, and I love gardening. Thinking this would be a good blog subject for potential viewers.
BUT believe me I feel it is time to get serious about these considerations. I am beginning to believe we are in the midsts of a social melt down. and it will be everyone for themselves, Forget about help from the government, look at New Orleans they are still rebuilding, but if it was a another country they would have been rebuilt with state of the art Construction thanks to your tax dollars. This brings my topic of survival to a whole new level. Don’t worry this is not a panic attack and I am not trying to scare anyone but we need to be ready. Just getting educated on these subjects is not enough, you need to make a plan and start gathering things you will need. And most important you need to use the tools you gather to become proficient at using them, you don’t want to learn in the middle of an emergency. There are so many subjects about surviving as far as food, water, shelter, weapons, fire, clothing, so many things to consider so just start thinking about what you would need to do to be ready, just in case. Remember this, It's better to be years early than a minute too late.

Sunday, September 20, 2009

Katadyn Water Filters


Nothing puts an end to epic adventures in foreign lands and cultures faster than tainted water; make sure you pack along the efficient Pocket Filter from Katadyn and prevent encounters with nearly all of the bacteria, protozoa and cysts you could encounter. Now any water source you approach can be used to fill your bottles and pots thanks to the silver impregnated ceramic element filter keeping your water clean; made of heavy-duty material so you can travel all 7 continents with 1 filter.

Features:
• Forget about boiling water, water tablets or hauling heavy purifying equipment; the compact design is ideal for packing and weights only 20 ounces
• Built to last and handle the rigors of travel thanks to the durability of the high-quality polypropelene housing material
• It meets industry standards for reduction of Klebsiella terrigena bacteria (99.9999%) and protozoan cysts like Giardia and Cryptosproidium (99.9%); larger than 0.2 microns
• Compact design and quick-connect fittings for easy attachment of hoses
• Efficient water output of up to 1 quart per minute; efficient and easy-use pump handle for filtration
• Pump as much as 13,000 gallons through it before replacing the cartridge
• Comes with prefilter, bottle clip, carry bag, measuring gauge and 2 abrasive cleaning pads to clean the pores of the cartridge
Specifications:
• Weight: 20 ounces
• Height: 10 inches
• Filter life: approximately 13,000 gallons
• Filtration rate: 1 quart per minute
• Housing material: polypropelene

Saturday, September 19, 2009

When the Lights Go Out


How Much Power Do I Need?

There are two basic power measurements for generators: peak power (also known as startup power) and continuous power. Both are measured in wattage.
• Peak power is the wattage required for appliances at startup or when they are running at their highest levels of power consumption.
• Continuous power is the wattage required for operation of those appliances under normal load.

Standby Generators: Standby generators create from 5,000 to 25,000 watts or more of power. You’ll have to choose a generator that supplies sufficient peak and continuous wattage for the appliances on the circuits you need to power.
You can choose between an air-cooled and a liquid-cooled model standby generator. Generally, liquid-cooled models are bigger and create more power.

Portable Generators: A small 1,000-watt portable generator may be all you need for recreational purposes. And you may use up to 8,000 watts if using a generator to power tools on the jobsite. Because you plug appliances directly into a portable generator, you’ll also want to make sure that your model has the number and type of outlets you need. The size of the fuel tank also is crucial. The bigger the tank, the longer your generator can run without refilling and produce power. If you want to use a portable generator to power specific circuits in your house–or the whole house–follow the guidelines for choosing a standby generator.

What Features and Accessories Do I Need?
Aside from pure power production, there are some useful features and accessories to consider when buying a generator.

Transfer switch: If you want to use your generator to power your home, you’ll need a sufficiently sized generator and a transfer switch. The transfer switch safely closes off the utility power line to your house’s electrical system and opens a direct line to the generator and reverses the process when utility power is restored. Standby models can work either with a manual or an automatic transfer switch. The benefit of an automatic transfer switch is that it senses when utility power has been lost and automatically switches to generator power.

Wheeled Frames: As the name suggests, portable generators can be transported to different locations. The smallest portable generators are comparatively light–perhaps 50 pounds–and can be carried. Larger models can weigh as much as several hundred pounds, making a wheeled frame essential for transportation.

Other Considerations:
• Noise: Generators aren’t necessarily quiet. Some offer extra features to reduce the noise created during operation.
• Weather Protection: Make sure the generator you purchase is suited for the climate in which you’ll use it.

How Do I Install and Operate a Generator
Standby Generators: Installing a standby generator by yourself may void the unit’s warranty or violate local building codes, so research these issues before you begin. The basic steps are as follows:

First, mount the unit outside your home on a concrete pad or plastic mounting pads that come with the generator. You may need a expert to pour the concrete foundation and mount the generator.
Next you’ll need to contact your gas or propane company to connect the unit to its fuel source.
Last, you’ll have to call an electrician to hook the generator up to your home’s electrical system. Some generators come with pre-wired kits that make it easier for the “do-it-yourselfer” to do the wiring. In most cases, it’s probably safest and best to have this work done for you.
Once installed, operation depends on whether you’ve used a manual or an automatic transfer switch. With an automatic transfer switch, if the generator senses a disruption in utility power, it turns itself on and takes over power production until utility power resumes. With a manual transfer switch, you have to handle these chores yourself. On a standby model, you’ll have to change the oil and filters on a regular basis. Many manufacturers provide maintenance kits to make this easier.

Portable Generators: If you’re not planning to hook your portable generator into your home or building’s electrical system, there is not a lot of setup involved other than finding a safe place outside your home for the generator. Because portable generators create carbon monoxide, you should never run them inside a building, beneath a window, or near any opening to your house (doors, vents, etc.). Once situated, fill the generator with the required type of gasoline and oil and start the unit. Startup can be as simple as pressing a switch, but on some you’ll have to yank a manual recoil pull-cord. Of course, you will have to plug the appliances you want to power into the generator, refuel it as necessary, and shut the generator off when you’re finished with it.

If you want to connect your generator to your home’s electrical system, you’ll need a manual transfer switch. Make sure your generator’s manufacturer supports connecting your model to a transfer switch. If supported, comply with your model’s safety and warranty guidelines as well any local building codes during the installation. In general, it’s best to hire an electrician to handle the wiring of your home to the generator and transfer switch.

However you use your generator, over time you’ll have to change filters, oil, and spark plugs. Plus, you should not store raw gasoline in the generator when you’re not using it. Either run the generator empty or add a gasoline stabilizer that will prevent the gasoline from “gumming” up. Many manufacturers sell tune-up kits for their models.

How Do I Run a Generator Safely?
• Do not operate generators indoors, in enclosed spaces, or near a window. Make sure there is proper ventilation for all exhaust.
• Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for installation, operation, and maintenance.
• Do not operate generators near combustible materials.
• Operate portable generators on a level surface.
• Do not plug a portable generator directly into your house circuit.• Do not attach a generator’s transfer switch to your circuit box yourself unless you’re very sure of what you’re doing. Check all applicable local, state, and national codes and the warranty information before you do this.